Do most writers have a quirk?


The reason, I ask is I was discussing this with a fellow writer and we had very different writing styles. Technically, she’s says that she’s more of a typist than a writer.  And I  like to let my characters dictate where the story is going.
I create characters as if they were real people. I don't confine them to any simple metaphors. I let the characters develop into who they are, with both good and bad personality traits.
And I assume that most writers do that too. 
That’s when your best writing comes out—when you let go and let the characters drive the story. Although, a bit of my own personality does reflect some of my heroine’s choices—but not all. I like my heroines to be feisty, quirky and funny. I like my heroes to be brooding, suave, and dangerous. I want my make-believe world to be an incredible adventure and an emotional journey for my readers. I want to create stories that before you know it; you’ll find yourself swept up in the intrigue as you hurry to turn those pages.
I like to think that my prose is a bit different from the “norm of young adult novels" you may be used to reading. My goal is to make my stories so suspenseful and believable that you will find yourself walking in the heroine's shoes, seeing the world through her eyes, speaking her words, and hopefully feeling her emotions.
My odd writing quirk?  

Well, when I’m writing a story in a specific genre I totally emerge myself in that theme. Don't want any outside distractions or influences...
For example, whatever genre or theme I’m writing; I ONLY read and watch anything related to that particular subject. Sort of like a method actor.
When I wrote the first few drafts of Beautifully Broken, I ONLY watched movies that had either ghosts or haunted houses and read stories about real ghostly encounters. I even read true stories about people who have encountered demons and shadow people. There was a ton of great information out there. 
Then I researched teen slang, wraiths, witchcraft, Wicca, magic, spell casting, and Victorian mansions. I wanted the heroine's encounters with the shadow people and demon to seem as real as possible. I read a ton of  documented paranormal cases to make the story more realistic. The research was fun and completely fascinating. Wanted to stay in the zone—so to speak. And it really gave me great ideas and helped me flesh out the story. 
Also, I visited the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, which is a Victorian mansion with over a 100 rooms. I've been obsessed with Victorians ever since I first toured the mansion as a child.
Since I love all things supernatural, it does instigate itself into my prose. As a result, I construct all my stories with some sort of dark, mysterious, and eerie setting. I like to listen to creepy music on YouTube and/or spooky sound effects (Halloween soundtracks are the best!) while I'm writing a suspenseful scene. 
When I started writing my adult paranormal/romance  novel, "Disenchanted" (with Pride and Prejudice undertones), I watched a ton of period-piece movies and read Jane Austen. I researched myths on immortals and necromancers, the city of Carmel, and Victorian dress and language. A lot of work, but so worth it!  
Now I'm researching Lycan/werewolf lore and zombie eating habits. 
I enjoy doing research, and aren’t we lucky as writers in this day and age to have the Internet—such a vast wealth of information—at our fingertips?
Maybe I’m just weird. ;-)

And you know what? I can live with that…


1 comment

  1. Yay! "Post a Comment" link is now live and working!"

    I love hearing about your writing method. It makes perfect sense that you would immerse yourself in research and sensory inspiration in order to create another world.

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